Hope Herein

Artist Jane Birrell MacKenzie

53cm x 60cm on canvas

We talked a lot around the subject of the feelings Louise experienced both with her diagnosis and also throughout her treatment and we discussed imagery which reflects both ideas of Hope and Fear. I was keen to approach this subject matter from a position of positivity, being aware that one of the most important issues surrounding survival from cancer is to maintain as positive and hopeful a disposition as possible- positive thoughts lead to positive action and this was an area we explored. What kind of images did Louise try to focus on? What gives her comfort and hope? I used these images – mostly inspired by nature and symbolism for healing when preparing the initial sketches and wanted to portray these as almost a tatoo-like replacement for her missing breast.

The larger final painting shows her torso and the area where her breast would be has been transformed to become a garden of Love, Hope and Healing. The dark background suggests the terror and fear surrounding her diagnosis and the cellular structures along the foot and up the sides of the frame, rise to become transformed into Gold Leaf flashes, reminiscent of the Japanese tradition of "Kintsugi" - mending broken crockery with seams of Gold; making something which is broken more beautiful in the process.
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Hope Herein

Hope Herein

Artist Jane Birrell MacKenzie

53cm x 60cm on canvas

We talked a lot around the subject of the feelings Louise experienced both with her diagnosis and also throughout her treatment and we discussed imagery which reflects both ideas of Hope and Fear. I was keen to approach this subject matter from a position of positivity, being aware that one of the most important issues surrounding survival from cancer is to maintain as positive and hopeful a disposition as possible- positive thoughts lead to positive action and this was an area we explored. What kind of images did Louise try to focus on? What gives her comfort and hope? I used these images – mostly inspired by nature and symbolism for healing when preparing the initial sketches and wanted to portray these as almost a tatoo-like replacement for her missing breast.

The larger final painting shows her torso and the area where her breast would be has been transformed to become a garden of Love, Hope and Healing. The dark background suggests the terror and fear surrounding her diagnosis and the cellular structures along the foot and up the sides of the frame, rise to become transformed into Gold Leaf flashes, reminiscent of the Japanese tradition of "Kintsugi" - mending broken crockery with seams of Gold; making something which is broken more beautiful in the process.
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Photographer: