One For Sorrow

Artist Lou Loakes

65cm x 95cm on canvas

I found it very hard to get started on this piece, the emotions kept flooding back and made it very hard for me to feel creative! I was also struggling with a very foggy mind and unpredictable energy levels thanks to the medication!

I wanted to ask the question “Could I still feel like a woman/wife/mother/ lover?”

“Would a Venus still be desirable if she had her arms but no breast?!
Or “Would Aphrodite be a goddess of love and beauty if she were missing a breast”

I positioned her to show the inner turmoil that accompanies this diagnosis, the awful decisions you have to make and the feelings of losing control and purpose and identity.
I wanted to include the family, their shocked disbelief and confusion without distracting from her, so I made them visions in the clouds, which are stormy and unsettled.
I also wanted to include all the family, friends and to be honest complete strangers I have been so fortunate to gain strength and support from throughout the ordeal and the shadows are those precious people.
Their translucent nature was to imply that many different people are affected and help, advice and support came in many forms, including my pets who love unconditionally and are a great comfort.
I used aspects of a piece of art in one corner, that symbolised how I felt inside at the time between diagnosis and waiting for the surgery ,(2 weeks!) which is “The Scream” by Edvard Munch. I liked the idea of using the bridge to indicate the journey we have travelled together.
The dandelion clock is to suggest the leap I felt in the aging process, time accelerated by the hormone therapy and its side effects and because cancer
survivors become acutely aware of the time they have left and how transient life is.
The magpie I used to title the piece, as the rhyme says “one for sorrow, two for joy”...which could also be applied to the number of breasts she has!

I hope the piece will stir some emotion, debate and awareness
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Photographer:
One For Sorrow

One For Sorrow

Artist Lou Loakes

65cm x 95cm on canvas

I found it very hard to get started on this piece, the emotions kept flooding back and made it very hard for me to feel creative! I was also struggling with a very foggy mind and unpredictable energy levels thanks to the medication!

I wanted to ask the question “Could I still feel like a woman/wife/mother/ lover?”

“Would a Venus still be desirable if she had her arms but no breast?!
Or “Would Aphrodite be a goddess of love and beauty if she were missing a breast”

I positioned her to show the inner turmoil that accompanies this diagnosis, the awful decisions you have to make and the feelings of losing control and purpose and identity.
I wanted to include the family, their shocked disbelief and confusion without distracting from her, so I made them visions in the clouds, which are stormy and unsettled.
I also wanted to include all the family, friends and to be honest complete strangers I have been so fortunate to gain strength and support from throughout the ordeal and the shadows are those precious people.
Their translucent nature was to imply that many different people are affected and help, advice and support came in many forms, including my pets who love unconditionally and are a great comfort.
I used aspects of a piece of art in one corner, that symbolised how I felt inside at the time between diagnosis and waiting for the surgery ,(2 weeks!) which is “The Scream” by Edvard Munch. I liked the idea of using the bridge to indicate the journey we have travelled together.
The dandelion clock is to suggest the leap I felt in the aging process, time accelerated by the hormone therapy and its side effects and because cancer
survivors become acutely aware of the time they have left and how transient life is.
The magpie I used to title the piece, as the rhyme says “one for sorrow, two for joy”...which could also be applied to the number of breasts she has!

I hope the piece will stir some emotion, debate and awareness
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Photographer: